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Fat Sewing News

Meditations on Fat Fit

For a long time, I didn’t know my body. Hell, I didn’t WANT to know my body. It was not my own, it was something I never recognised when I looked in the mirror, I just didn’t want it. Avoiding my body was actually quite easy, I knew clothing stores just weren’t for me; it only took a couple of times trying on pants in a fitting room only to get them up to just above the knee and not an inch higher, that I got over that.

It’s so strange to think back on that person, and so surprising then that I pursued a career in costuming, where I look at and scrutinise bodies on a daily basis. I learnt my trade full time over three years and one of the most interesting elements for me to learn was how to fit a costume to the body. When learning this skill we would use our classmates as fit models, so each would have a turn at fitting and being fitted. We would stand in a special fitting room with floor to ceiling mirrors at the front and back, and one on the ceiling (because why not!?). The fluorescent lighting then made it ten times worse than any department store change room. I remember the anxious growling of my stomach before going into a fitting session that could last hours. First, we would assess the overall fit; are there drag lines, does something need to be let out or taken in. We would examine every curve and the way fabric would fall over it, where the waist was sitting, the fullest part of the hip, if the shoulders sat differently, if one thigh or bicep was fuller than the other, how posture affects fit. It was a process through which there were many toiles and countless alterations, and as uncomfortable and torturous as it sounds, it taught me how to understand and be comfortable with my body. The costumes we made would be anything from an 1880s bustle dress with a corset to 1930s silk satin palazzo pants or 1912 tea dress (see the photo series bellow). Each time as a model, I became better at standing still in front of the mirror. I’d go into a sort of meditative state, where I’d stand tall and proud, I’d breath slowly and deeply, and I began to understand that achieving a good fit for my body is not impossible AND I deserve a garment that fits just as much as any other body.

Up to that point, my body was always just an interim body, and one day, I would graduate into the true body that I was meant to have, that I deserved to have.

I can’t say that I’ve completely come out of that thinking, it still lingers, but I now know how to be present with myself and be critical of that thinking. Accepting and celebrating what I have here and now and sitting still with my body and mind, has become an important practice for me. Learning how to make costumes and clothes for myself is one of the most liberating things I have ever done.

These days I love understanding and examining my curves and lines, my rolls and folds with the same care and precision I bring to other peoples bodies at work. Whether working with a commercial pattern or drafting for myself, I know my body and the adjustments I need to make to get the fit that makes me feel good. For me, learning in a small class and following fat makers is where I began and to continue to learn. There is so much to learn when it comes to fit, and I urge anyone learning how to fit their body to stay curious and kind. Because the right fit, feels like nothing else.

First bodice, skirt and sleeve block toile in the fitting rooms, before fitting. Notice any drag lines? haha

Following alterations to blocks, our task was to create a 1912 Japanese inspired tea dress. Please excuse the early smart phone quality photos!

Second fitting in main fabric. I was definitely well into meditation in the mirrors at this point. We had to stick to a period accurate design whilst constantly altering to find the right fit.

Final fitting. I think my smile says it all. Notice the difference in the drape of the pleats at the front over my hips, the opening of the neckline, and the fit of the belt at my underbust.

Final photo of completely fitted and altered 1912 tea dress. This costume and all its toiles were made by my very talented classmate Rosalie Boland, at the National Institute of Dramatic Art in Sydney, Australia.

Jacqui Lucey is a costumier for film, tv and theatre, living on Gadigal land. She’s a slow fashion enthusiast, and always down to talk about making. You can find her on IG @jacqlucey_makes

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Fat Sewing News

Get involved!

We’re looking for diverse voices in fat sewing to blog about their experiences.

If you would like to put together a blog for FatSewing.Club, please send an email to Jess at jess.sewing.clothes[ at ]gmail [dot] com

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Fat Sewing News Maker Blogs

I am enough

Hello! I’m Emma (@emma.m.makes over on insta) and I’m a Canadian sewist living in Denmark. I moved here with my husband last year after graduating with a BA in textile design and sadly had to leave the fabric shop I worked at/my sewing family. I miss it immensely so joining the sewing community on instagram has helped me still feel connected. I’m relatively new to this community and first off I have to say wow, what an amazing place. 

I just want to add a little trigger warning. I’ll be speaking about loss which might be triggering for some. 

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Fat Sewing News Maker Blogs

Gender, Fat, and Aging

I was 10 the first time I really remember being misgendered. I was by myself at the salon assigned to foreigners in Beijing in 1979, to get my hair cut before going home to Canada for the summer vacation. I was in shorts and a tee shirt, a lanky-long slip of a thing not quite at puberty. As the stylist cut my hair shorter and shorter, and more hair fell down on the floor, my Mandarin fled. When she finally pulled the clippers out, I shrieked, “Wo bu shi baba! No, no, I am not a father!” Soon I had a flutter of platitude-murmuring, middle-aged ladies about me, trying to rectify my gender with kiss curls around my ears and as much height as they could possibly put in my now-shorn hair, while I wept hot tears of shame into my Barbapapa t-shirt.

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Fat Sewing News Maker Blogs

Learning to sew, learning to see

When people ask me how I’m keeping myself grounded during lockdown, I reply, “I’m learning to sew!” When people ask me if I sew, I say “I’m a beginner!” I don’t really feel like I’m a sewist yet, because that implies that I have some idea of what I’m doing, but calling myself a beginner feels exciting without pressure – it’s a kind of liminal space where I can thrash around in the pool of fabric without worrying too much about how professional (or not) the results look. I started to sew because I wanted to wear bright colours and bold prints and natural fibres and although the plus-size ready-to-wear market has gotten better, it’s still a slog to find something that ticks all those boxes. I never would have stuck with sewing, though, if I hadn’t found the process so much fun, in the most challenging, infuriating, exhilarating ways.

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Fat Sewing News Maker Blogs

The resilient sewist

TW: death, grief and burnout

I started to sew clothes 10 years ago, next July. It’s a weird thing to know the date of, but I remember it as it’s the summer my father died.
I was lucky to have a great relationship with my dad so the months following his death were the worst of my life.

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Fat Sewing News Maker Blogs

Sewing saved me.

TW: talk of death, body measurements, depression, weight, weighing, body image, body positivity

The other day, Jess (@Fat.Bobbin.Girl on Instagram), posed a question that really got me into my feels.  The question: What has sewing meant to you/ what has sewing enabled you to do?

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Fat Sewing News

Our 9th giveaway

Head on over to Instagram to enter the draw to win a PDF pattern of your choice from Friday Pattern Company, Sew DIY, True Bias as well as 3 packs of labels of your choice from Stitch Collective

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Fat Sewing News Maker Blogs

Learning to be Fat

Over the years, I’ve spent a lot of time and energy trying to disguise my fatness from the rest of the world. Of course, now I have realized that not only is it pointless (I am fat – it’s a fact and everyone can tell), I have also come to the point where I just don’t care who knows.

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Fat Sewing News

Our 8th Giveaway

Our latest giveaway in celebration of #MMMayPlus2020 is live on instagram and gives you the chance to win a premium or a basic download pack from My Body Model!

To enter the competition you’ll need to leave a comment on the instagram post and say what you’d use your custom croquis from My Body Body for! If you’re looking for some ideas, check out this blog post which wraps up some great fat-sewing inspo over on the My Body Model blog.